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Sample Cases (Aliens of extraordinary ability)


EB1A-50: The petitioner/beneficiary was an atmospheric scientist (climate change modeling) and worked at a US national lab. She received PhD in the United States and published about 20 journal papers. Some papers were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved several days later (no RFE).


EB1A-49: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in another country and published about 20 journal papers. These papers were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved one day later (no RFE).


EB1A-48: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in another country and published about 30 journal papers in national and international journals. Some papers were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved in 2013 (no RFE).


EB1A-47: The petitioner/beneficiary was a microbiology scientist and worked at a US public university. She received PhD in another country and published about 10 journal papers. One paper was widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved one week later (no RFE).


EB1A-46: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biomedical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in the United States and published over 10 journal papers. These publications were widely cited . The petition was filed in 2013 and approved several days later (no RFE).


EB1A-45: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist and worked at a US Federal agency. He received PhD in another country and published about 10 journal papers. These publications were cited about 100 times in total. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved two months later (RFE).


EB1A-44: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in the United States and published about 10 journal papers. These publications were modestly cited by others. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved several days later (no RFE).


EB1A-43: The petitioner/beneficiary was a chemical and biochemical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in the United States and published about 20 journal papers. These publications were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2013 and approved several days later (no RFE).


EB1A-42: The petitioner/beneficiary was a chemical scientist and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in the United States and published about 10 journal papers. These publications were cited about 50 times. Part of the petitioner's work was commercialized by a company. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved two months later (no RFE).


EB1A-41: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (cancer research, protein modification, etc.) and worked at a US medical school. She received PhD in the United States and published 5 journal papers. Two publications were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-40: The petitioner/beneficiary was an environmental scientist and worked at a US university and Federal agency. He received PhD in a foreign country and published about 40 journal papers. Several publications were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-39: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (biophysics) and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD in the United States and published over ten journal papers. These publications were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-38: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (cancer biology) and worked at a US medical school. She received PhD in a foreign country and published several journal papers. These publications were cited about 130 times. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-37: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (structural biology) and worked at a US Federal research institute. He received PhD in a foreign country and published several journal papers. These publications were cited about 100 times. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-36: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (reproductive science) and worked at a US medical. He received PhD in the United States and published about 30 journal papers. These publications were widely cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-35: The petitioner/beneficiary was a mathematician (applied mathematics) and worked at a US national laboratory. She received PhD degree in the United States and published over ten journal papers. These publications were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later. No RFE.


EB1A-34: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (structural biology) and worked at a US medical school. He received PhD degree in the United States and published about ten journal papers. These publications were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved two months later. No RFE.


EB1A-33: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research scientist (information theory and communications engineering) and worked for a US company. He received PhD degree in the United States and published over ten journal and conference papers. These publications were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-32: The petitioner/beneficiary was an electrical engineer (wireless network communications) and worked for a major US high-tech company. He received PhD in the United States and published over ten research articles. These publications were modestly cited by others. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012.


EB1A-31: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research scientist with specialties in natural language recognition. He received his PhD degree in a foreign country and published about thirty research articles. These publications were modestly cited. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved two months later.


EB1A-30: The petitioner/beneficiary was an inorganic chemist and worked as a research scientist at a US national laboratory. He received PhD in the United States and published about twenty research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-29: The petitioner/beneficiary was a theoretical chemist and worked as a research scientist at a US national laboratory. She received PhD in the United States and published over twenty research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-28: The petitioner/beneficiary was a bioinformatical scientist. He received PhD in the United States and published over ten research articles. His work was cited over 1000 times in total. The petition was filed  in 2012 and approved one month later.


EB1A-27: The petitioner/beneficiary was an environmental scientist and worked as a research scientist at a US university. He received PhD in the United States and published five research articles. His work was cited around 100 times in total. The petition was filed  in 2012 and approved one and half months later.


EB1A-26: The petitioner/beneficiary was a leading electrical scientist and worked as a tenure-track Assistant Professor at a famous US university. He also earned PhD at a US and world's top school. The petition was filed  in 2012 and approved several days later.


EB1A-25: The petitioner/beneficiary was a chemical scientist. He earned PhD in an foreign country and worked as a Postdoctoral scholar at a US university. The petition was filed in July, 2011 and approved in 2012.


EB1A-24: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist at a US medical school. When the petition was filed, he published about 20 research papers. These publications were widely cited by others. Some of these publications were reported and highlighted in scientific news media. The petitioner reviewed about 20 times for  journals. The petition was filed in December, 2011 and approved several days later.


EB1A-23: The petitioner/beneficiary was an atmospheric scientist at a US National Laboratory. When the petition was filed, he published about 20 research papers. These publications were widely cited by others. The petitioner reviewed about 20 times for multiple journals. The petition was filed in November 2011, and approved several days later.


EB1A-22: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research scientist at a US university. When the petition was filed, she published about 20 research papers, half of them in non-English journals. These publications were modestly cited. The petitioner won a national award in a foreign country. The petition was filed in August 2011 and approved in October 2011.


EB1A-21: The petitioner/beneficiary was a tenure-track Assistant Professor and computer scientist at a US university. When the petition was filed, she published nine journal and conference papers which were widely cited by others. The petitioner was frequently invited to serve as a reviewer for journals and conferences. The petition was filed in August 2011, and approved several days later.


EB1A-20: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research Assistant Professor at a US medical school. He obtained PhD in a foreign country. When the petition was filed, the petitioner published about 20 research articles; some of the publications were substantially cited by others. The petitioner also served a reviewer for several journals. The petition was filed in August 2011, and approved about 10 days later.


EB1A-19: The petitioner/beneficiary was a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Computer Science at a US university. When the case was filed, the petitioner published over 30 research articles which were cited about 100 times. The petitioner was frequently invited to review research manuscripts for journals and conferences. The petition was filed in July 2011 and approved several days later.


EB1A-18: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist in the United States. He received MS from a US college. When the case was filed, the petitioner published six original research articles, reviewed over 20 times for several international journals and accumulated over 80 independent citations to his work. The petition was filed in May 2011, and approved several days later.


EB1A-17: The petitioner/beneficiary was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at a US university. He published 35 original research articles that were cited over 1000 times. He also frequently reviewed research manuscripts for journals/conferences. The petition was filed in April 2011, and approved in May 2011.


EB1A-16: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist working at a US non-profit organization. She obtained PhD in a foreign country and published 17 research articles in her academic career. She also reviewed about 20 times for different journals and was a member of the Editorial Board of a journal. The petition was filed in March 2011 and approved in April 2011.


EB1A-15:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a computer scientist in the United States. He published about 20 research articles that were widely cited by others. The petitioner also reviewed many research manuscripts for journals and international conferences. He won two prestigious fellowships (many winners of these fellowships became NAS or NAE members, or even won Noble Prizes). The petition was filed in January 2011 and approved several days later with the request of premium processing service.


EB1A-14:  The petitioner/beneficiary obtained PhD in medical sciences from a foreign country. He published over 40 research articles that were widely cited by others. He also won a national award in his home country. The petition was filed in August 2010 and approved in February 2011 (with the request of premium processing service after pending for over three months).


EB1A-13: The petitioner/beneficiary was a PhD graduate of a US university. She published ten original medical research articles, four of them in international journals. The petitioner's work was widely cited by others. The petitioner also reviewed research manuscripts for four different journals. The petition was filed in February 2011 and approved several days later with the request of premium processing service.


EB1A-12 The petitioner/beneficiary was a structural biologist and worked as a specialist at a US public university. When the petition was filed, the petitioner published 16 research articles that were widely cited by others. The petitioner also served as a judge of the work of others. The petition was approved 10 days after filing and with the request of premium processing service. No RFE.


EB1A-11 The petitioner/beneficiary was an Assistant Professor at a US public university, specializing in Electrical Engineering. He published around 40 journal and conference papers. He also won a national award in the United States. However, the petitioner's publication were minimally cited by others. The petition was approved 12 days after the filing and with the request of premium processing service. No RFE.


EB1A-10:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a theoretical chemist. He published about 40 original research articles which were widely cited by others. The petition was approved 10 days after filing, with the request of premium processing service. No RFE.
 
EB1A-9:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a biochemist. He won two national awards in a foreign country and published many research articles which were widely cited by others. The petition was approved 10 days after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-8: the alien was a computer scientist and worked at a US research university as a postdoctoral fellow. He published three journal articles and several conference papers. All the publications were cited by others for around 80 times. The alien served as a referee for several journals and several conferences. The petition was approved 10 days after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-7:  The petitioner/beneficiary was an epidemiologist and worked for a US Federal government agency. She played a leading and critical role in a Federal program. She also published multiple research articles that were widely cited by others and reviewed research manuscripts for several journals. The petition was approved three months after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-6:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a climate scientist and earned PhD in the United States. When the petition was filed, he published around 40 research articles. These articles were cited about 660 times.  The petitioner/beneficiary also provided review services for about 10 professional journals. The petition was approved three weeks after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-5 The petitioner/beneficiary was a food scientist. When the petition was filed, she published eight research articles. These articles were cited about 110 times.  The petitioner/beneficiary reviewed over 20 times for different journals. Three months after filing, this petition was approved without RFE.

 

EB1A-4 The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist. When the petition was filed, the client published 30 research articles. The client's work was cited for a total of 280 times. The petition was approved seven days after  filing.
 
EB1A-3:  The petitioner/beneficiary earned PhD degree in Materials Science in a foreign country and published over 30 research articles. These articles were cited about 80 times. The alien reviewed over 100 times for many different journals. The petition was approved three weeks after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-2:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and earned PhD degree in the United States. When the petition was filed, she published two research articles, which were cited for around 50 times. One article was highlighted on major news media. The petition was approved four weeks after filing. No RFE.
 
EB1A-1:  The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and earned PhD in the United States. When the petition was filed, he published five research articles. Some of the articles were highlighted in professional publications. The articles were cited for a total of 160 times. The petition was approved four weeks after filing. No RFE.