WANG LAW FIRM Let a former scientist handle your immigration affairs

 
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Sample Cases (National Interest Waiver)


NIW-50: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (biology and bioinformatics) working at a US university. He received Ph.D. degree in the United States and published one research article and two review articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved three months later. No RFE.

NIW-49: The petitioner/beneficiary was a chemica scientist (drug development) working at a US university. He received Ph.D. degree in a foreign country and published over ten research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved three months later. No RFE.

NIW-48: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (signal transduction and biomedical engineering ) working at a US biopharmaceutical company. He received Ph.D. degree in the United States and co-authored several research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved two months later. No RFE.

NIW-47: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (aging and development) working at a US research institute. He received M.S. degree in the United States and published two research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved two months later. No RFE

NIW-46: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (neuroscience and tissue engineering) working at a US university. He received Ph.D. degree in a foreign country and published over ten research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved three months later. No RFE.

NIW-45: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (cancer research) working at a small US company. She received an M.S. degree in the United States and co-authored several research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-44: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (neuroscience) working at a US medical school. He received PhD degree in a foreign country and published over 10 research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-43: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (cancer research) working at a US medical school. He received PhD degree in a foreign country and published over 10 research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-42: The petitioner/beneficiary was materials scientist and physicist (nanotechnology). She received PhD degree in the United States and published several research articles. The petition was filed in 2012 and approved in two months.No RFE.

NIW-41: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist (stem cell research) working at a US medical school. She received PhD degree in a foreign country and published over 10 research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-40: The petitioner/beneficiary was a postdoctoral research scientist with specialties in bioinformatics. He received PhD degree in the United States and published over 10 research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-39: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research scientist with specialties in structural biology. He received PhD degree in a foreign country and published over 10 research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-38: The petitioner/beneficiary was a research scientist with specialties in electronic engineering (automatic speech recognition). He received PhD degree in a foreign country and published many research articles. The petition was filed in 2011 and approved in 2012. No RFE.

NIW-37: The petitioner/beneficiary was an electrical engineer. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a small US company. He also published several research articles that were cited several times in total by others. The petition was filed in February, 2011, and approved in January, 2012. No RFE.

NIW-36: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist. She earned PhD in the United States and worked at a Postdoctoral Scholar at a US medical school. The petitioner published several research articles that were modestly cited  by others. The petition was filed in August, 2011, and approved in December, 2011.

NIW-35: The petitioner/beneficiary was an Assistant Professor at a US university. He earned PhD in a foreign country. The petitioner published about 20 research articles that were frequently cited by others. The petition was filed in September, 2011, and approved in December, 2011.

NIW-34: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a Postdoctoral Scholar at a US university. The petitioner published several research articles that were substantially cited  by others. He also invented a research tool that benefited many other researchers in the academic field. The petition was filed in October, 2011, and approved in November, 2011.

NIW-33: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biochemical scientist. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a Postdoctoral Scholar at a US university. The petitioner published several research articles that were cited modestly by others. The petition was filed in June, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-32: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist. He earned PhD in the United States and worked as a Postdoctoral Scholar at a US research institution. The petitioner published two original research articles from his PhD study which were modestly by others. The petition was filed in September, 2010, and approved in November, 2011.

NIW-31: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a major US pharmaceutical company. The petitioner published several research articles that were cited modestly by others. The petition was filed in July, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-30: The petitioner/beneficiary was an analytical chemist. She earned MS in the United States and worked at a US hospital. The petitioner published several co-authored research articles that were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in September, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-29: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist. He earned PhD in a foreign country and worked at a US Federal agency. He published several research articles that were cited modestly by others. The petition was filed in July, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-28: The petitioner/beneficiary was a civil engineer. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a small US company. He published several research articles that were cited several times by others. The petition was filed in August, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-27: The petitioner/beneficiary was a pharmaceutical scientist. She earned PhD in the United States and worked at a US medical school. The petitioner published about research articles. Some of them were cited by others. The petition was filed in August, 2011, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-26: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist. He earned PhD in the United States and worked at a US start-up company. He published several research articles that were modestly cited. The petition was filed in November, 2010, and approved in October, 2011.

NIW-25: The petitioner/beneficiary was an economist and worked at a US public university. He earned PhD in the United States and published one journal article. He also had several conference presentations. There were no citations to the petitioner's publications. However, his ongoing economic research was urgently needed in the United States. The petition was filed in November, 2010, and approved in September, 2011.

NIW-24: The petitioner/beneficiary was an epidemiologist and worked at a US private university. She earned PhD in the United States and published over 10 research articles. She also have some publications in foreign language. All the publications were modestly cited by others. The petition was filed in January, 2011, and approved in September, 2011.

NIW-23: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist and worked at a US Federal agency. He earned PhD in a foreign country and published about 20 research articles. Some of the petitioner's foreign language publications were heavily cited by scholars in his home country. The petition was filed in February, 2011, and approved in September, 2011.

NIW-22: The petitioner/beneficiary was a biological scientist and worked as a US university. He earned PhD in the United States and published several research articles. All the publications were cited less than 20 times. The petition was filed in May, 2011, and approved in September, 2011.

NIW-21: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist working at a US medical school. She earned PhD in the United States and published several research articles. All the publications were cited around 30 times. The petition was filed in January, 2011, and approved in September, 2011.

NIW-20: The petitioner/beneficiary was a pharmaceutical scientist working at a US research institute. He obtained PhD from a foreign country and published several research papers. These publications were substantially cited by others. The petition was filed in September 2010 and approved in June 2011. No RFE.

NIW-19: The petitioner/beneficiary was a medical scientist working at a US hospital. She obtained PhD in an foreign country and published several research articles. These articles were modestly cited by others. The petition was filed in January 2011 and approved in May, 2011. No RFE.

NIW-18: The petitioner/beneficiary was a molecular biologist working for a US university. She obtained PhD in an foreign country and published several research articles. These articles were modestly cited by others. The petition was filed in August 2010 and approved in January 2011. No RFE.

NIW-17: The petitioner/beneficiary was a plant scientist and working at a US university as a Postdoctoral Scholar. She obtained PhD in a foreign country. She published five English-language research papers and more than a dozen Chinese-language papers. However, only the Chinese papers were modestly cited by others. The petition was approved three and half months after filing. No RFE.

NIW-16: The petitioner/beneficiary was a Postdoctoral Scholar and cancer research scientist at a US medical school. She got PhD in the United States and published several original research papers. These publications were minimally cited by others. The petition was approved three and half months after filing. No RFE.

NIW-15: The beneficiary/petitioner was a chemical scientist and working for a U.S. company. He published two original research articles which were modestly cited by others. The petition was approved three months after filing. No RFE.

NIW-14: The petitioner/beneficiary was a structural biologist and worked at a U.S. research institution. He earned PHD in a foreign country and publishe several research articles. His work was cited by others modestly. The NIW immigration petition was approved three months after filing. NO RFE.
 
NIW-13: The petitioner/beneficiary was a molecular biologist and working at a US medical school. He obtained PhD in a foreign country and published several research articles. These articles were modestly cited by others. The alien was facing the expriation of his H-1B time and needed the immigration approval for H-1B extention. Attorney Wang drafted five recommendation letters for the client and carefully organized and presented the petition. The case was approved four months after filing. No RFE.
 
NIW-12: The alien beneficiary/petitioner was a very successful research scientist. After almost six years of postdoctoral training, he located a faculty position at a US university. However, he was facing the expiration of his 6-year H-1B time within the next several months. With the help of Attorney Wang,  the NIW petition was managed to be filed within three weeks after the alien first emailed to the law firm. One month later, the petition was approved.
 
NIW-11: The alien beneficiary/petitioner was a senior research scientist at a US medical school. He was facing the expiration of his 6-year H-1B time within the next several months. With the help of Attorney Wang, the NIW petition was managed to be filed 8 days after the alien first contacted the law firm. Three months later, the petition was approved and the alien saved the chance of continuing his employment and stay in the United States.
 
NIW-10: The alien was an envionmental scientist and worked as a postdoctoral scholar at a US public university. She published three research articles that were cited by others for 12 times. However, the alien made substantial contribution in a foreign country envionmental program before she came to the United States. The alien demonstarted that she can serve the national interest to a substantially greater degree than a US worker. The petition was approved one month after filing. No RFE.
 
NIW-9: The alien was an epidemiologist and worked for a US Federal agency. She made signifincant scientific contributions. Her service for the Federal agency directly benefits the country as a whole. The petition was approved three months after filing. No RFE.
 
NIW-8: the alien was a physical scientist and obtained PhD in the United States. When the petition was filed, the alien had published 13 research articles. Two of the articles were highlighted in different news media. All the articles were cited for about 130 times. The petition was approved five months after filing. No RFE.
 
NIW-7: the alien was a chemical scientist and obtained PhD in the United States. When the petition was filed, the alien had published over 10 research articles and the total citations were about 100 times. The petition was approved one month after filing. No RFE.
 
NIW-6: the alinen ontained PhD in a foreign country and was working in a U.S. medical school. When the petition was filed, the alien published about 20 research articles in English and non-English professional journals. All the articles were cited for about 90 times. This case was transfered from USCIS Texas service center to Nebraska center after the filing. However, after 7 months, the petition was approved without RFE.
 

NIW-5: the client obtained Ph.D. in Pharmacology in a foreign country and published six original research articles, two of them in non-English journals. These publications were cited by others for over 20 times. Six weeks after filing, the petition was approved without RFE.

 

NIW-4: the client was working in a big biotechnology company. When the petition was filed, the client published eight research articles in English journals. The total citation was about 150 times. The client was born in a country for which the concurrent filing of both the NIW immigration petition (I-140) and application for adjustment of status (I-485) was allowed. Four months after we filed both I-140 and I-485 for the client, the client received green card without RFE.

 

NIW-3: the client was working for a top U.S. medical school in the area of gene therapy. When the petitioner was filed, the client published four original research articles and co-authored several review articles. The petitioner was approved in three weeks without RFE.

 

NIW-2: the petitioner graduated with PhD from a U.S. university and was working for a medical school. When the petitioner was filed, the petitioner published eight research articles in English journals and three articles in non-English journals. The petitioner's work was cited for a few times. This petition was approved in six weeks without RFE.

 

NIW-1: the petitioner graduated with PhD from a U.S. university and is working as a research faculty member. When the case was filed, the petitioner published eight research articles and these articles were cited for over one hundred times, including citations in Chinese scientific publications. The client also reviewed for a journal for multiple times. This petition was approved three months after filing.